Fermented Parsnips with Lemon, Ginger & Peppercorns (vegan, paleo, keto)

You can do this with 2 quart masons or a 2 Liter swing top and some fermenting lids and weights. I have taken to pouring a bit of avocado or olive oil on top of my vegetables to help keep out the bacteria.

The flavor is delicate and void of the bitterness I usually find in parsnips. I like them regardless but fermenting makes them palatable to even the worst parsnip critics. Like say, my husband and children.

For this recipe I used a 2 quart pickle jar.

Ingredients: 

Method: 

  1. Lay all your tools on a cookie sheet with a silicone baking mat
  2. in the oven and heat to 180°F to sanitize everything.
  3. Peel, rinse and chop your carrots either into sticks or rounds to desired thickness (we did both because littles were helping)
  4. Fill your sanitized jar with washed, unpeeled and sliced parsnips (if not organic, peel and rinse them) leaving a couple inches room at the top.
  5. Dissolve 1 1/2 – 2 tablespoons kosher saltsea salt or pink salt per 2 cups non-chlorinated water and pour over the top, repeating until all your veg is covered. (I added the borrowed ferment liquid to top mine off)
  6. Insert sanitized jar or fermenting weight to keep vegetables submerged. Close lid. If you do not have fermenting or swing lids, cover with a towel to keep bacteria out. 
  7. Wait 2-7 days, depending on your taste. 
  8. Save the juice for other ferments!

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Easy Fermented Carrots (vegan, paleo, keto)

Most people know these as those pickled carrots you can sometimes get in really authentic Mexican restaurants.  And “pickled” is appropriate, or at least used to be an appropriate term for fermenting carrots.  These days pickling often refers to a method of preserving vegetables in vinegar… or even sugar (gasp!).  But before the Industrial Revolution, we called upon the wild yeasts to help us keep our food through winter.  I prefer this method as you get a punch of good gut bacteria to aid you.

A few quart masons or a 2 Liter swing top and some fermenting lids and weights are helpful but you can do this with loosely fitted plastic lids or swing top lids and a sanitized little jar small enough to insert on top of the veg. On occasion I have used a sterile ziplock filled with water and stuffed it on top of the vegetables.

For this recipe I used a 2 liter Kilner jar and aided my ferment with some cultured juice from a friend as I was having trouble with my carrots due to some lively unidentified wild yeasts.

Ingredients: 

Method: 

  1. Lay all your tools on a cookie sheet with a silicone baking mat in the oven and heat to 175 degrees Fahrenheit to sanitize everything.
  2. Peel, rinse and chop your carrots either into sticks or rounds to desired thickness (we did both because littles were helping)
  3. Fill your sanitized jar with washed, unpeeled (if organic, peeled if not) and sliced carrots, leaving a couple inches room at the top.
  4. Dissolve 1 1/2 – 2 tablespoons sea salt per 2 cups non-chlorinated water and pour over the top, repeating until all your veg is covered. (I added the borrowed ferment liquid to top mine off)
  5. Insert sanitized jar or weight to keep vegetables submerged. Close lid. If you do not have fermenting or swing lids, cover with a towel to keep bacteria out. 
  6. Wait 2-7 days, depending on your taste. 
  7. Save the juice for other ferments!

Fermented carrots are simple easy and our whole family loves them. Sometimes I throw in a jalapeño, garlic or something fun but I find my family prefers it simple.  


Super Gut Healthy Fermented Red Onions!

How I missed Red Onion Chutney when I first made the move away from sugars in my diet. It was sooo good for sprucing up sandwiches, salads and as a garnish to entrees.

Once I discovered fermenting though… a whole new world of peppery flavors opened up to me. I love when food bites back. This is simple, yet one of my staple favorites. I also used a different method to ferment this batch and was pleased with its simplicity. Point to the old school of food preservation here!

Onions are rich in prebiotic (gut healthy) fibers and fermenting them adds to that a product rich in probiotics.  Prebiotics sort of run through your system and don’t account for much in the way of calories but they feed your microbiome (the good bacteria in your gut) to keep you strong and healthy.  If you didn’t love onions before now at least you have a basic understanding of their benefits.  After fermenting you get the “full package” with these super gut health stars.  And they taste pretty amazing as well!

Ingredients: 

Method: 

  1. Lay all your tools on a cookie sheet with a silicone baking mat
  2. in the oven and heat to 170 degrees Fahrenheit to sanitize everything.
  3. Peel, wash and slice your red onions into thin strips, or use a mandolin.  For speed (which is completely necessary when you have 3 or more children running around) I used the latter method.
  4. Pile the onions into the sanitized 2 Liter jar.
  5. Smash down with a washed French rolling pin or wooden spoon to release juices and be sure you have a couple inches space at the top.
  6. Cover with non-chlorinated water and your salt of choice.
  7. Weigh down with a sanitized fermentation weight or small jar.
  8. Wait 2-3 Days for the healthy bacteria to grow then serve and enjoy!  The juices will take on the color of the onion, which is a good indication of readiness.

A half batch of this is perfectly reasonable and will come out just the same. I just really like these.

They are a double whammy of good gut health and flipping tasty.