Cultured Fir Tip Hummus (Vegan, Paleo Hacked, keto cycling)

If you saw my post on collecting fir tips back in May you might have wondered what I do with it other than just put them in goats brie grilled cheese… and this is the big one! I’ve been doing keto for a while now to help keep my inflammation down but I’m in a new stage that is called by a few names: “carb cycling”, “keto cycling”, “carb up”, etc. Call it what you like… but because even Dr. Berg approves of real home made hummus (and he doesn’t even ferment his!) I am so very happy to have my beloved chickpeas back in my diet guilt free. Lately I’ve been following Leanne Vogel and I love her take on women’s hormonal cycle and keto. This doesn’t mean going out of ketosis, but it means I can stretch it a bit further on these days and stay in ketosis. I am fully embracing having a higher carb day in a week, and certainly having a higher carb time of the month! By the way those are the 10th – 15th days of your cycle; the ones leading up to ovulation. Here come the raspberries, sweet potatoes and you guessed it! Home cultured hummus!

Ingredients:

Method

I like to use dried chickpeas, so I measure them out and soak them overnight.  Pour into a bowl or container, fill with water and cover.  In the morning, strain and rinse the chickpeas.  Bring a pot of water to boil, pour in the chickpeas and simmer for 1 1/2 hours.  Strain the chickpeas in a colander and rinse.

While your chickpeas are cooking, wash, trim and your parsley and sage.

Add the chickpeas and all other ingredients to your food processor (hold out the olive oil) and process until smooth.

If serving immediately, spoon into a bowl and stir in 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, then drizzle a bit more on the top. Serve with crudite platter or chips.

If fermenting, hold out the olive oil until the very end. Transfer hummus to a 2 litre clip top jar, cover with the olive oil and clamp closed.  Slowly rotate the jar until the olive oil seals the entire empty surface.  Leave to ferment for 2 days.  Once finished, stir the olive oil in and store in a 1 liter glass jar or BPA free container in the fridge.

Pro Tip: Make sure your jar is a third larger or double the capacity of your hummus so you don’t wake up to wasted work all over the counter.

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Cultured Baba Ganoush (paleo, keto, vegan)

Cultured Baba Ganoush: post-fermentation method

This is my second post on the popular aubergine hummus otherwise known as baba ganoush. Most Americans will know it as an eggplant, but I first had it in France and found the rest of the world also calls it by its french name: aubergine. Frankly it sounds much more appetizing than eggplant so I’ll stick with it. I love how it roasts and grills to smoky excellence and comes alive with extra virgin olive oil and sea salt. I have been making smokey baba ganoush for years and it is one of my favorites with crudités or a mezze platter. I have been known to eat it straight with a spoon as well. The last time I posted this was with the pre-fermentation or “classical” method. You can read that post here. Personally I find this method easier as it is exactly like making any other fermented hummus.

Consuming fermented foods aids your microbiome (the life in your gut) and helps your neurotransmitters send positive signals to your brain. This can help manage things like anxiety and inflammation and also helps your body process other vitamins more effectively.

Now, I have had a bit of a nightshade issue but the fermentation does deal with that issue to some extent. But that being said, I have had this post in my drafts for some time and am getting it out there while at the same time possibly saying goodbye to my beloved baba for who knows how long. We shall see! This is a much easer method than the pre-fermentation method and also allows you to remove the skins and seeds if needs be in order to lessen the source of nightshade related inflammation. So please enjoy. This is made with love. 🙂

Ingredients:

*If you want more authentic baba ganoush, put these optional ingredients in. If you want the more Romanian version, leave them out. For this recipe I put in the cilantro but left out the lemon. It made for a lovely smooth and smoky hummus.

Method:

  1. When picking your aubergines consider that the insides will shrink when roasting. The longer you roast, the less final product you will have. so when eyeballing them imagine the total product for each one to be about 1/2 – 2/3 the size.
  2. Roast your aubergines in a preheated oven at  350ºF/175°C until just blackened, turning over in between. This should take about an hour but keep an eye on them as it can vary according to size.
  3. When ready you should be able to poke the tops and feel a small pocket of air. Remove and let cool.
  4. While the aubergine is cooling, sanitize your jars and lids at 175 degrees Fahrenheit in the oven for 5 minutes.
  5. When they are cool enough to pick up, pull the tops off and scrape the insides into a colander to let any juices drain out. Often they are dry enough that I can skip this step. Set aside the juices.
  6. Place the strained aubergine in your food processor with roasted & diced or fermented onion (if using diced you will need to add a 1/2 cup culturing juice) or whey) and all other ingredients except for the olive oil. If you need more liquid, add in some of the strained juices. Process until smooth.
  7. Scoop the contents carefully into your jar. I used a 1.5 liter swing top kilner jar for this.
  8. Pour the olive oil over the top, close the lid and carefully turn the jar until the gap of air is coated in olive oil up to the rim of the lid. This will keep any bad bacteria out and allow the air bubbles to escape as the hungry wild yeasts do their magic. You always want a jar that has at least 1/3-1/2 empty after your ferment is inside when it comes to hummus, mash, sauces etc as they can get a little over excited… believe me. I have come downstairs to the hummus blob and olive oil all over my kitchen counter. No fun.
  9. Leave to ferment for 1-3 days depending on taste.  Once finished, stir the olive oil in and store in a 1 liter glass container in the fridge.

If serving immediately, leave out the culturing liquid.  Spoon into a bowl and stir in 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, then drizzle a bit more on the top. I sometimes just save some out, culturing liquid and all and serve with olive oil.


Cultured Yellow Squash Hummus (vegan, paleo, keto)

Finished Ferment, day 3.

Fermented Yellow Squash Hummus

I love hummus.  I know that’s a strong word but it really is one of my favorite foods.  Lately though I have been dealing with some inflammation issues and have gone a mostly plant based keto to help manage it.  I’ve tried making keto hummus before but wasn’t particularly impressed with the recipes or results.  For this, I chose yellow summer squash.  I diced it and dry roasted it in a cast iron pan at 350°F for an hour.

I leave out the chili flakes when making this for kids, but it is awesome with.  I used cultured onion juice for fermenting this hummus. The flavor is smooth, full of that mediterranean tahini taste and roasted notes and has a nice depth to it.

Enjoy!

Photo above: 24 hours into fermentation.  It’s alive!

Ingredients:

Method:

Wash, remove the tops and halve the yellow squash lengthwise and then cut into 1″ sections. Dry roast at 350°F for 1 hour. Put all ingredients in a food processor (hold out the olive oil) and process until smooth.

If serving immediately, leave out the fermenting liquid.  Spoon into a bowl and stir in 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, then drizzle a bit more on the top. Serve with crudite platter or chips.

If fermenting, hold out the olive oil until the very end. Transfer hummus to a 2 litre clip top jar, cover with the olive oil and clamp closed.  Slowly rotate the jar until the olive oil seals the entire empty surface.  Leave to ferment for 2-3 days depending on your preference.  It will be cultured after 24 hours but you will have a stronger bite and more gut healthy bacteria after 2 or 3 days.  It is an acquired taste so if you’re new start with 1-2 days.  Once finished, stir the olive oil in and store in a 1 liter glass jar in the fridge.

Pro Tip: Make sure your jar is at minimum 1 1/2 times the capacity of your culture.  Double is best.  If your jar is too small it will grow right out of the jar and all over your kitchen counter.

Yellow Squash Hummus, day 1.

Cultured Chickpea Hummus (vegan, paleo hacked)

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Fermented Hummus

My girls and I are hummus fanatics.  My son even likes it from time to time.  But fermented hummus has the added bonus of healthy bacteria and comes with a peppery kick that I love.  It is favorite around our home and I love that it will keep in the fridge for months.  Not that it ever lasts that long around our house…  I made a batch of this hummus and my fermented beetroot hummus for a neighbor when we were living in Northern Ireland and the last jar came back four months later.  I thought she had forgotten but she said she had been savoring it and had only finished it the day before.  True Story.

I leave out the chili flakes when making this for kids, but it is awesome with.  I prefer to use whey for fermenting hummus.  It is mild in flavor and my kids like the result, but a clear liquid from a previous culture (like carrots) or water kefir works if you are dairy intolerant or vegan.  I have made it with water kefir for my cousin and her daughter and they love it.  Sometimes I will roast sesame seeds in a cast iron pan until slightly blackened to replace the tahini because it gives a nice, smoky flavor.  I like my hummus with a bit more texture but if you prefer it smooth, give it a bit longer in the food processor.  Enjoy!

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Photo above: day two of ferment.  It’s alive!

Ingredients

250g dried chick peas, soaked overnight and cooked, or 2 (16-oz.) cans, drained and rinsed (makes about 4 cups)

4-6 garlic cloves

½ cup cultured onion brine or other cultured vegetable liquid from a previous ferment, whey from a batch of live yogurt or milk kefir, or water kefir (in theory you could try kombucha, but I’ve never done)

3-4 tablespoons tahini, toasted sesame seeds or toasted sunflower seeds

juice of 1 lemon

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

1 teaspoon cumin

1 tsp ancho chili flakes

1 tsp turmeric

1 tablespoon sea salt, celtic sea salt or pink salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

¼ – ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil (poured over top to seal out bacteria)

1-3 teaspoons chia seeds (optional, but blend in if it is too wet)

Method

I like to use dried chickpeas, so I measure out 250 grams (a little over a 1/2 pound/8oz) and soak them overnight in.  Pour into a bowl or container, fill with water and cover.  In the morning, strain and rinse the chickpeas.  Bring a pot of water to boil, pour in the chickpeas and simmer for 1 1/2 hours.  I’m totally lazy and ADD so I prefer to stick them in the crockpot and forget about them until I have time to get to them.  Once cooked, strain the chickpeas in a colander and put all ingredients in a food processor (hold out the olive oil) and process until smooth.

If serving immediately, leave out the whey.  Spoon into a bowl and stir in 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, then drizzle a bit more on the top. Serve with crudite platter or chips.

If fermenting, hold out the olive oil until the very end. Transfer hummus to a 2 litre clip top jar, cover with the olive oil and clamp closed.  Slowly rotate the jar until the olive oil seals the entire empty surface.  Leave to ferment for 2 days.  Once finished, stir the olive oil in and store in a 1 liter glass jar or BPA free container in the fridge.

Pro Tip: Don’t cheat on the size of the jar.  If your jar is too small it will swell to nearly double it’s size and you will find that the Blob has escaped in a sloop of hummus and olive oil all over your kitchen counter.